janelle_spoltman's Media Stream

Salt lowers freezing point

Salt lowers freezing point

janelle_spoltman
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02:15

IV and DV

IV and DV

janelle_spoltman
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03:16

condensation sublimation and deposition: screen cast lecture

condensation sublimation and deposition: screen cast lecture

janelle_spoltman
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11:51

Sublimation And Deposition (Chemistry Demonstration)

Both sublimation and deposition phase changes are demonstrated, using dry ice, a copper penny, and some readily available water vapor

janelle_spoltman
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02:07

What Is A Virus ? | Best Learning Videos For Kids | Dr Binocs | Peekaboo Kidz

Hey, did you know that almost every ecosystem on Earth contains viruses? Join Dr. Binocs as he gives you a joyride of information about the most spectacular organism of this world, a VIRUS! Discusses why viruses are not considered organisms.

janelle_spoltman
30
04:21

Science for Kids: Heat Energy Video

For the proper use of "heat" energy- stopy video at 4:36 minutes.

janelle_spoltman
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06:47

Experiments Explained: Clear and Simple! Learn the Basics

He does have the testable question as a yes/no question Independent vs. dependent variables, control vs. experimental groups, and the role of constants are explained

janelle_spoltman
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07:40

Independent vs. Dependent Variables

This animation describes the difference between independent variables and dependent variables as they relate to biology. This is the second video in a two-part series. Watch the first video, "Controlled Experiments", here: https://youtu.be/D3ZB2RTylR4

Biology: Controlled Experiments Control and Experimental Group

This animation describes the process of conducting a controlled experiment. This is the first video in a two-part series. Watch the second video, "Independent vs. Dependent Variables", here: https://youtu.be/nqj0rJEf3Ew

janelle_spoltman
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04:06

LAB SAFETY Video - I Think School.com

LAB SAFETY Video - I Think School.com

janelle_spoltman
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03:24

Amoeba Sisters: General Lab Safety

This Amoeba Sisters video introduces science lab safety guidelines with memorable illustrations and an accompanying handout listed under "safety" on http://www.amoebasisters.com/handouts. This video includes the discussion of proper lab attire, importance of proper disposal of materials, precautions when heating substances, and the importance of the MSDS (pinned comment note: this term has actually been replaced with SDS). As mentioned throughout the video, these are only general safety guidelines and there are many more that may be applicable to specific labs- always read specific lab guidelines. The end of this video prompts viewers to pause so that the following items can be located in the lab room (where applicable): eyewash, safety shower, aprons, goggles, gloves, fume hood, fire extinguisher, fire blanket, fire exit route map, container for broken glass, biohazard bag, chemical waste disposal, broom and dustpan, first aid kit, MSDS, and phone.

janelle_spoltman
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05:53

Comprehensive Earth Tectonics and Rock Cycle

Comprehensive Earth Tectonics and Rock Cycle

janelle_spoltman
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21:32

Rock Cycle & Plate Tectonics

Rock Cycle & Plate Tectonics

janelle_spoltman
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11:03

Cell Structure Prokaryotes & Eukaryotes, Organelles Virtual Animation

Cell Structure Prokaryotes & Eukaryotes, Organelles Virtual Animation

janelle_spoltman
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07:21

Plant and Animal Cells powerpoint description

Plant and Animal Cells powerpoint description

janelle_spoltman
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07:09

Earth: The Core

Earth: The Core

janelle_spoltman
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36:45

Formation of Sedimentary Rock Layers

Formation of Sedimentary Rock Layers

janelle_spoltman
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01:51

Grand Canyon: How it was made

Grand Canyon: How it was made

janelle_spoltman
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44:02

Scary Sounds of Space

Scary Sounds of Space

janelle_spoltman
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01:51

Black Holes: spaghettification

Black Holes: spaghettification

Minute to Win It Caddy Stack

Minute to Win It Caddy Stack

Muscles, Part 1 - Muscle Cells: Crash Course A&P #21

We're kicking off our exploration of muscles with a look at the complex and important relationship between actin and myosin. Your smooth, cardiac, and skeletal muscles create movement by contracting and releasing in a process called the sliding filament model. Your skeletal muscles are constructed like a rope made of bundles of protein fibers, and that the smallest strands are your actin and myosin myofilaments. Its their use of calcium and ATP that causes the binding and unbinding that makes sarcomeres contract and relax. Table of Contents Smooth, Cardiac, and Skeletal Muscles Create Movement 1:18 Sliding Filament Model 4:52 Skeletal Muscles Are Made of Bundles of Protein Fibers 2:40 Actin and Myosin Myofilaments 3:54 Calcium and ATP Cause the Binding and Unbinding 5:05

Muscle and stem cells: Repair after major trauma

When massive injury occurs in the skeletal muscle, for example after a snake bite, muscle stem cells (satellite cells), engage in the regeneration process. Residual debris are removed by the macrophages and new muscle fibers are generated within the collagen matrix of the pre-existing basement membranes.

Mitosis and Cell Division with the Skin

In this animation, we explore mitosis, the key process in cell division during which duplicated chromosomes are segregated into separate daughter cells.

Amoeba Sisters Mitosis: The Amazing Cell Process that Uses Division to Multiply! (Updated)

Updated Mitosis Video. The Amoeba Sisters walk you through the reason for mitosis with mnemonics for prophase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase. Expand details to see table of contents.👇 Video handout here: http://www.amoebasisters.com/handouts Table of Contents: Why is Mitosis Important? 0:44 Why Don't You Want Cells Dividing all the Time? 2:00 Interphase (occurs before mitosis) 2:23 DNA and Chromosomes 2:55 Chromosome Replication 4:07 PMAT Mitosis Stages 5:30 Cytokinesis (actual splitting of cell) 7:30

TED Ed How a wound heals itself - Sarthak Sinha

Our skin is the largest organ in our bodies, with a surface area of about 20 square feet in adults. When we are cut or wounded, our skin begins to repair itself through a complex, well-coordinated process. Sarthak Sinha takes us past the epidermis and into the dermis to investigate this regenerative response.

Funbrain: Learn about Line Graphs

In this video you will learn about line graphs which are very important if you track some data over the period of time. In this Video, Amber prepares himself for the running competition but he was confused about tracking his improvements hence his mom teaches him about the line graph and how he can keep a track of records to see his improvement in the easiest way.

Learning About Line Graphs

Learning About Line Graphs

TED Ed: How the food you eat affects your gut - Shilpa Ravella

The bacteria in our guts can break down food the body can’t digest, produce important nutrients, regulate the immune system, and protect against harmful germs. And while we can’t control all the factors that go into maintaining a healthy gut microbiome, we can manipulate the balance of our microbes by paying attention to what we eat. Shilpa Ravella shares the best foods for a healthy gut.

TED Ed What would happen if you didn’t drink water? - Mia Nacamulli

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-would-... Water is essentially everywhere in our world, and the average human is composed of between 55 and 60% water. So what role does water play in our bodies, and how much do we actually need to drink to stay healthy? Mia Nacamulli details the health benefits of hydration.

TED Ed Oxygen’s surprisingly complex journey through your body - Enda Butler

iew full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/oxygen-s-su... Oxygen forms about 21% of the air around us. In your body, oxygen forms a vital role in the production of energy in most cells. But if gases can only efficiently diffuse across tiny distances, how does oxygen reach the cells deep inside your body? Enda Butler tracks the surprisingly complex journey of oxygen through your body.

TED Ed How your digestive system works - Emma Bryce

View full lesson: https://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-your-d... Across the planet, humans eat on average between 1 and 2.7 kilograms of food a day, and every last scrap makes its way through the digestive system. Comprised of ten organs covering nine meters, this is one of the most complicated systems in the body. Emma Bryce explains how the different parts of the digestive system work to transform your food into the nutrients and energy that keep you alive. Lesson by Emma Bryce, animation by Augenblick Studios.

Wormholes Explained – Breaking Spacetime

Are wormholes real or are they just magic disguised as physics and maths? And if they are real how do they work and where can we find them?

What's Inside A Black Hole?

Black holes are mysterious and bizarre objects in the universe that really have no explanation. In fact, we hardly know anything about what lies inside of a black hole. We know and understand what we see on the outside of a black hole, but we have no way of going inside one to take a look at what is really happening. Even if we sent a probe inside a black hole, it would not survive the journey, and there would be no way that the probe could transmit a signal outside once it had been sucked inside. This is because a black hole is the product of mass being squeezed together so densely, and so tightly, that it creates a gravitational pull that is so strong, that not even light can escape its grasp. Supermassive black holes with masses millions to billions of times that of the sun are thought to lurk at the hearts of all galaxies in the universe. You may notice that when you see a photo of a spiral galaxy, such as the Milky Way, in the center of the galaxy is a giant mass of light, which many people would think looks like a massive sun. But this is not light coming from the black hole itself. Remember, that light cannot escape the heavy gravitational pull. Instead, the light we see comes from the magnetic fields near a spinning black hole that propel electrons outward in a jet along the rotation axis. The electrons produce bright radio waves. Quasars are believed to produce their energy from massive black holes in the center of the galaxies in which the quasars are located. Because quasars are so bright, they drown out the light from all the other stars in the same galaxy. You’re probably asking, ‘well, what’s a quasar?’ A Quasar is the short name for ‘quasi-stellar object’ and is a very highly energetic object surrounding an actively feeding Supermassive Black Hole. In more basic terms, the Supermassive Black Hole in the middle of a galaxy feeds intermittently. As it feeds, gas swirls around it at incredible speeds and forms an insanely bright hot orbiting disk. And if the black hole is swallowing a large amount of material, this feeding is accompanied by gigantic jets of gas. These are called Quasar. They are essentially fueled by the Black Holes they orbit.

How Astronomers Took The First Ever Image Of A Black Hole

The Event Horizon Telescope has become the first ever to take an image of a supermassive black hole. The black hole is located 55 million light-years away in the Messier 87 galaxy.

The Most Extreme Black Holes In The Universe

Black holes are the densest, most powerful objects in the universe. Capable of ripping entire planets and stars to pieces. This animation reveals what the smallest black holes look like compared to the largest.

Animal Size Comparison - Extinct vs Living

This video is about comparison of animal size, putting living animals against extinct animals. This animal size comparison video will pitch the largest living animals against the largest extinct animals. These animals are pitch by type for example, the largest living elephant vs the largest extinct elephant, the largest whale vs largest extinct whale, the largest living shark vs largest extinct shark. Some of these extinct animals dwarf the living animals in size and comparison. The giant ground sloth, the megatherium is around 4 tonnes and 20 feet in height and in comparison the largest living sloth is 8 kilograms or 18 pounds in size. Have fun with this size comparison video entitled: Animal size comparison - Extinct vs Living.

Insect digestive and excretory systems- grasshopper

Structures and functions of a typical insect digestive and excretory system

Crash Course: Tissues Part 1

n this episode of Crash Course Anatomy & Physiology, Hank gives you a brief history of histology and introduces you to the different types and functions of your body's tissues. -- Table of Contents: Nervous, Muscle, Epithelial & Connective Tissues 1:23 History of Histology 2:07 Nervous Tissue Forms the Nervous System 5:17 Muscle Tissue Facilitates All Your Movements 7:00 Identifying Samples 9:03

Grasshopper Dissection

Grasshopper Dissection

The Hierarchy of Life

Paul Andersen explains how biology is ordered in the hierarchy of life. He first of all describes how emergent properties appear as you move to more inclusive systems. The then describes life at the following levels; atom, molecule, macromolecule, organelle, cell, tissue, organ, organ system, organisms, population, community, ecosystem, biome and finally biosphere

Earthworm Dissection: original version

Earthworm Dissection: original version

Earthworm Dissection With Bonus Model of Earthworm

Earthworm Dissection With Bonus Model of Earthworm at the beginning

Cell Energy: The Mitochondria & Chloroplasts

Cell Energy: The Mitochondria & Chloroplasts

Khan Academy Prokaryotes vs Eukaryotes

Prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Bacteria and archaea.

Prokaryotes vs Eukaryotes

This quick video is a compare and contrast of prokaryotic cells verses eukaryotic cells. The basic features of each are described, as well as similarities and differences.

2 minute classroom: Plant Cells vs. Animal Cells

You've heard about plant cells and animal cells, no learn the main differences between plant and animal cells. Thanks for stopping by, this is 2 minute classroom and today we are talking about the differences between plant and animal cells. Plant and animal cells are remarkably similar, but there are three main differences I will discuss. Both plant and animal cells have mitochondria, but only plant cells have chloroplast. This is the organelle responsible for photosynthesis, and, of course, animals don’t perform photosynthesis. Most energy for life on the planet comes from the sun through photosynthesis in the chloroplast. Both plant cells and animal cells have vacuoles. These are used for storage in the cell. However, only plant cells have a large central vacuole that contains mostly water. It’s this central vacuole that gives plants their stability and turgor. Lastly, we have the cell wall. While both plant and animal cells have cell membranes, only plant cells have a cell wall. This cell wall gives plant cells their shape and structure. However, the cell wall does not regulate inflow and outflow of molecules, that is still the job of the cell membrane. So now you know the main differences between plant and animal cells.

Amoeba Sisters- Introduction to Cells: The Grand Cell Tour

Compares and contrasts prokaryote cells and eukaryote cells before exploring organelle structures and functions! Video includes the modern cell theory and plant vs. animal cell comparisons. Contents of Major Points in Video: Cell Theory: 1:10 Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes 1:55 Tour Inside Cell Explaining Organelles and Structures 3:11 Plant Cells vs. Animal Cells 7:11 Pathway of Protein Out of Cell 8:15 *As mentioned in video, the structures and organelles mentioned in the video have more functions than able to fit in this short video. We highly encourage you to explore these to discover more! Cell organelles and structures discussed include the cytoplasm, golgi, endoplasmic reticulum, ribosomes, cell membrane, cell wall, vacuoles, mitochondria, and chloroplasts.

GCSE Science Biology (9-1) Surface area to volume ratio

In this video, we explore what is meant by the surface area to volume ratio of an organism. We then look at how to calculate the surface area to volume ratio. We then explore how gills are used by fish to increase the absorption of oxygen into the bloodstream.

Surface Area, Volume, and Life

This video explains how the relationship between surface area and volume is a key factor in determining the shape and form of living things. The video uses a series of demonstration involving diffusion into agar cubes of various sizes, applies the insights from these demonstrations towards understanding the following topics: 1) why cells are small, 2) the evolution of huge ears in elephants, 3) how flatworms can survive without a circulatory or respiratory system 4) the evolution of huge size in whales, 5) our instinct to hold our hands against our bodies when it gets cold.

Why Are Cells Small? By Bozeman Science

This video begins with a simple geometry problem and ends with a discussion of Allen's Rule and reasoning for the microscopic nature of cells.

Amoeba Sisters: Cellular Respiration and the Mighty Mitochondria

Explore how ATP is made in 3 steps of aerobic cellular respiration with the Amoeba Sisters! This also compares this process to photosynthesis and introduces ATP structure

Cellular Respiration

This 2-minute animation discusses the four stages of cellular respiration. These include glycolysis, the preparatory reaction, the citric acid cycle, and the electron transport chain. ATP production is also discussed.

Amoeba Sisters: How Cells Become Specialized

How do cells in your body differentiate into other types of cells? Explore cell specialization featuring stem cells and their role in cell differentiation

Amoeba Sisters: Cell Transport

Table of Contents: Importance of Cell Membrane for Homeostasis 0:41 Cell Membrane Structure 1:07 Simple Diffusion 1:45 What does it mean to "go with the concentration gradient?" 2:20 Facilitated Diffusion 2:38 Active Transport 4:53 (including endocytosis 5:36 exocytosis 6:36) Transport types covered include simple diffusion, facilitated diffusion, endocytosis, and exocytosis. ATP discussed at 4:35.

Biology: Cell Structure- Nucleus Medical Media

This animation by Nucleus shows you the function of plant and animal cells for middle school and high school biology, including organelles like the nucleus, nucleolus, DNA (chromosomes), ribosomes, mitochondria, etc. Also included are ATP molecules, cytoskeleton, cytoplasm, microtubules, proteins, chloroplasts, chlorophyll, cell walls, cell membrane, cilia, flagellae, etc.

Ted Ed: Could the Earth be swallowed by a black hole? - Fabio Pacucci

From asteroids capable of destroying entire species to supernovae that could exterminate life on Earth, outer space has no shortage of forces that could wreak havoc on our planet. But there’s something in space that is even more terrifying than any of these -- something that wipes out everything it comes near. Fabio Pacucci examines the probability of Earth being gobbled up by a black hole.

Prokaryotic vs. Eukaryotic Cells (Updated) by the Amoeba Sisters

This Amoeba Sisters video starts with providing examples of prokaryotes and eukaryotes before comparing and contrasting prokaryotic cells with eukaryotic cells! Free handout at https://www.amoebasisters.com/handouts. More detail about cell structure and organelles can be found in our cells video: https://youtu.be/8IlzKri08kk Contents: 1:27 Modern Cell Theory 1:37 3 Domains (with examples of Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes) 2:23 Similarities of Prokaryotic Cells and Eukaryotic Cells 3:18 Differences of Prokaryotic Cells and Eukaryotic Cells

Bacteria: Amoeba Sisters

Let the Amoeba Sisters introduce you to bacteria! This video explains bacterial structure, reproduction, and how not all bacteria are "bad!" Video also briefly mentions endospores, plasmids, and bacteria transformation.

janelle_spoltman
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07:30

Ted Ed: Cell Theory

Ted Ed: Cell Theory Scientific discovery isn't as simple as one good experiment. The weird and wonderful history of cell theory illuminates the twists and turns that came together to build the foundations of biology.

How to Use a Microscope by Murry Gans

Students- you will NOT go into the prep room to get the microscopes unless instructed to do so by your teacher. Our 6th grade microscopes only have one eye piece. Published by Eastfield College

Human Circulatory System

Human Circulatory System animation

janelle_spoltman
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04:52

Digestion in Human Beings 3D CBSE

Human beings take food through mouth and digest it in specific organs for digestion. The undigested food is defecated. The food we take passes through a specific canal which begins with buccal cavity and ends at the anus. This canal is called alimentary canal or the digestive tract.

janelle_spoltman
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06:54

How the Digestive System Works

By: KidsHealth.org Published on Sep 3, 2014 Watch this movie about your digestive system, the system that handles the food you eat.

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05:08

Digestive System

By: It's AumSum Time Our topic for today is Digestive System in Humans. Digestion is a process in which complex food material is broken down into simpler substances. The digestion of food in humans takes place in the alimentary canal, which is a long tube extending from the mouth to the anus. The different parts of the alimentary canal are buccal cavity, food pipe or oesophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine and anus. Two glands namely, liver and pancreas also help in digestion. The food is taken in through the mouth. It is chewed and mixed with saliva in the buccal cavity. Saliva is a digestive juice secreted by the salivary glands. The chewed food enters into the food pipe or oesophagus and is then slowly pushed into a bag like structure called stomach. The food is churned in the stomach to further break it down. The stomach also secretes mucous, digestive juices and hydrochloric acid. The hydrochloric acid kills the bacteria in the food and makes the food acidic. The food then goes into a highly coiled tube called small intestine. The small intestine receives secretions from the liver and pancreas. The liver secretes bile juice while the pancreas secretes pancreatic juice. The walls of the small intestine also secrete juices, which help in further digestion of food. The inner surface of the small intestine has finger like projections called villi. The villi have extensive network of blood vessels. The digested food is then passed into the blood vessels . The undigested food is passed into the large intestine. It is wider than the small intestine. Excess of water and salts are absorbed here and undigested waste is passed out of the body through the anus

janelle_spoltman
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03:48

Rocks & Minerals

By Earth Science WesternAusterlia This short animation takes viewers through the rock cycle. It is a fast paced and colorful way to introduce the rock cycle to any class.

janelle_spoltman
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03:44

Sedimentary Rock by GeoScience Videos

In this video we will classify the three major types of sedimentary rocks (clastic, chemical, biochemical) and give examples of each. You can learn how to casually drop terms like haboob, coccolithophore, and conglomerate into conversation.

Identifying Minerals

Identifying Minerals

A Brief Introduction to Minerals

Characteristics, Properties, and Uses

From atoms to rocks: no audio

From atoms to rocks: no audio

Diamond & Graphite: words only no audio

Diamond & Graphite: words only no audio

Distance Time Graph

Distance Time Equation Graph is usually to represent the given information. The speed time graph is the graph obtained by plotting data of speed along y-axis and time data along x-axis. By using the speed time graph we calculate the acceleration given by Slope = Δ y / Δ x The distance time graph is obtained by plotting distance along y-axis and time along x-axis. It is used to determine the speed by finding the slope.

janelle_spoltman
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02:52

ADI Tennis Ball Graphing

ADI Tennis Ball Graphing

ADI Tennis Ball Lab Report: Data

Use this video for general directions for writing out how your group did the experiment, general directions for creating your graphs on paper, and inputting your data table. Another video will be created to help with creating your graphs.

janelle_spoltman
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05:08

ADI Tennis Ball Lab Report Introduction

Use this video to help you start your Tennis Ball Lab Report

What is Energy?

Produced for the 2017 Flame Challenge, organised by the Alda-Kavli Learning Center for Science Communication. The challenge is to explain a scientific topic to an audience of 11-year-olds in 5 minutes or less. This year's challenge is, "What is Energy?"

janelle_spoltman
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05:00

Ted Ed: A guide to the energy of the Earth - Joshua M. Sneideman

Energy is neither created nor destroyed — and yet the global demand for it continues to increase. But where does energy come from, and where does it go? Joshua M. Sneideman examines the many ways in which energy cycles through our planet, from the sun to our food chain to electricity and beyond.

janelle_spoltman
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04:43

Ted Ed:All of the energy in the universe is... - George Zaidan and Charles Morton

All of the energy in the universe is... - George Zaidan and Charles Morton The energy in the universe never increases or decreases -- but it does move around a lot. Energy can be potential (like a stretched-out rubber band waiting to snap) or kinetic (like the molecules that vibrate within any substance). And though we can't exactly see it, every time we cook dinner or shiver on a cold night, we know it's there. George Zaidan and Charles Morton get excited about energy

janelle_spoltman
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03:51

ADI: How to make a double line graph in google sheets

ADI: How to make a double line graph in google sheets

janelle_spoltman
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06:05

Conservation of Energy: Free Fall, Springs, and Pendulums

Conservation of Energy: Free Fall, Springs, and Pendulums Uses Bar graphs to show energy is always conserved

janelle_spoltman
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05:18

Potential and Kinetic Energy For Kids

Potential and Kinetic Energy For Kids

janelle_spoltman
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04:38

What is Geotechnical Engineering

What is Geotechnical Engineering

Soil Texture Triangle Tutorial

Soil Texture Triangle Tutorial: How to read the Soil Triangle

Station Work: How to graph distance vs. time

Station Work: How to graph distance vs. time

Graphing Distance-Time Graphs

Graphing Distance-Time Graphs

janelle_spoltman
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05:49

Interpreting Distance Time Graphs

Interpreting Distance Time Graphs: The graph is a little blurry, but you should be able to follow along with the points she uses.

janelle_spoltman
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05:12

Easy way to learn speed, distance, and time

Easy way to learn speed, distance, and time

The Difference between Speed & Velocity

The Difference between Speed & Velocity

What is Speed? For kids

What is Speed? For kids

Temperature and phase change graph

Temperature and phase change graph

Latent Heat explained with temperature

Latent Heat explained with temperature

The arrangement of particles in solids, liquids and gases - Edukite Learning

The arrangement of particles in solids, liquids and gases - Animation

Temperature, Thermal Energy, and Heat PowerPoint Video

Temperature, Thermal Energy, and Heat PowerPoint Video

Eureka! Temperature vs Thermal Energy

Remember, this video is using the term "heat" incorrectly. Everytime it says "heat" you need to say "thermal Energy"

Eureka! Measuring Temperature

Eureka! Measuring Temperature

Heat, Temperature, and Thermal Energy

Heat, Temperature, and Thermal Energy

ADI White Board Draft Heat & Matter

ADI White Board Draft Heat & Matter

Veterans Day: Jay Leno Surprises a Veteran From Ohio

Veterans Day: Jay Leno Surprises a Veteran From Ohio

Taps: Veterans Day PowerPoint

Taps: Veterans Day PowerPoint

Thank you for your service (A moment of truth)

Thank you for your service (A moment of truth)

Science Lab Safety by Crash Course

These are general directions: hair, goggles, & clothing

Scientific Method Extension #1 Video

Scientific Method Extension #1 Video

Plasma: The most common phase of matter in the Universe

Plasma: The most common phase of matter in the Universe

What is plasma?

What is plasma?

Chemistry of Ice, Water, & Steam

Chemistry of Ice, Water, & Steam

5 facts about density

5 facts about density

Density of Gases

Density of Gases

Motion of Particles Animated Motion & Spacing

Motion of Particles Animated Motion & Spacing

Geysers, how do they work?

Geysers, how do they work?

How are hot springs formed?

How are hot springs formed?

YellowStone Geysers & Hotsprings

YellowStone Geysers & Hotsprings

Why do we name people- The origin of last names

Why do we name people- The origin of last names

Parking Ticket Experiment: The Science of Empathy

Parking Ticket Experiment: The Science of Empathy

Empathy can change the world

Empathy can change the world

The importance of Empathy by Life Hacker

The importance of Empathy by Life Hacker

Making Measurements: Different sizes of graduated cylinders

Making Measurements: Different sizes of graduated cylinders

How to Read a Graduated Cylinder

How to Read a Graduated Cylinder

Questions 17-22, 24 Matter & Molecules Practice Test explanation

Questions 17-22, 24 Matter & Molecules Practice Test explanation

Questions 8-16 Matter & Molecules Practice Test explanations

Questions 8-16 Matter & Molecules Practice Test explanations

Questions 1-7 Matter & Molecules

Questions 1-7 Matter & Molecules Practice Test explanation

Matter & Molecules Question 23 Review

Matter & Molecules Question 23 Review

Matter & Molecules Station Packet

Matter & Molecules Station Packet: use this video to help with the back page of the packet.

How to study vocab flashcards

How to study vocab flashcards

How to Access Schoology Calendar Team 601

How to Access Schoology Calendar Team 601

How to read a metric ruler

How to read a metric ruler

Reading a Metric Ruler

Reading a Metric Ruler

The Metric System by Teacher's Pet

The Metric System by Teacher's Pet

Metric System - explained simply

Metric System - explained simply

Ted Ed: Why the Metric System Matters

Ted Ed: Why the Metric System Matters

janelle_spoltman
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05:07

Top 10 Strangest Elements

Top 10 Strangest Elements

What's the difference between an Atom and a Molecule?

What's the difference between an Atom and a Molecule?

Ted Ed: Just how small is an atom

Ted Ed: Just how small is an atom

Difference between a molecule and a compound

Difference between a molecule and a compound

How to study vocab flashcards

How to study vocab flashcards

Ted Ed just how small is an atom

Ted Ed just how small is an atom

Otterbein: Mass of Writing on Paper

Otterbein: Mass of Writing on Paper

janelle_spoltman
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00:41

Mass of Air in Balloon

Otterbein: Mass of Air in Balloon before and after

Mass of Writing on Paper

Otterbein: Mass of Writing on Paper before and after

Mass of Dissolved Sugar

Otterbein: Mass of Dissolved Sugar before and after

Inspiring: change the world by making your bed

Inspiring: change the world by making your bed

Kid President: A Pep Talk

Kid President: A Pep Talk

How to adopt a growth mindset

How to adopt a growth mindset to help work towards goals

Types of Chemical Bonds Chemistry Crash Course

Types of Chemical Bonds Chemistry Crash Course

Covalent Bonding | It's AumSum Time

Covalent Bonding. Noble gases have complete outer electron shells, which make them stable. The coming together and sharing of electron pairs leads to the formation of a chemical bond known as a covalent bond. Two chlorine atoms come together and share their electrons to form a molecule of chlorine. In this way, each atom will have eight electrons in its valence shell. As a single pair of electrons is shared between them, the bond is known as a single covalent bond. A single covalent bond is represented by a single dash between the atoms. When two oxygen atoms come together, they each share 2 electrons to complete their octets. Since they share two pairs of electrons, there is a double bond between the oxygen atoms. Similarly, Nitrogen atoms share a triple covalent bond to form a molecule of Nitrogen.

Lewis Dot Structures

Finally, you'll understand all those weird pictures of molecules with the letters and the lines and the dots! Those are lewis dot structures. Let's learn how to draw them. It's easier than you think.

Lewis Diagrams Made Easy: How to Draw Lewis Dot Structures

This is a Videoscribe tutorial of how to draw Lewis diagrams for elements and simple molecules. Lewis diagrams (aka Lewis structures, Lewis dot structures, Lewis dot diagrams) are useful because they use simple drawings to show how atoms share valence electrons in molecules, polyatomic ions, and other covalent structures. This is my first tutorial in the series. For simple molecules, follow these 5 steps: 1) count all the valence electrons 2) put the singular atom in the middle 3) draw in single bonds 4) put remaining electrons in as lone pairs 5) give every atom an octet or duet by turning lone pairs into double or triple bonds as needed

Ted Ed: The 2,400-year search for the atom - Theresa Doud

Ted Ed: The 2,400-year search for the atom - Theresa Doud

Ted Ed: The Invisible Motion of still objects

Ted Ed: The Invisible Motion of still objects- thermal energy and temperature

Building the Law of Conservation of Matter with Bricks

Building the Law of Conservation of Matter with Bricks

Difference between Thermal Energy and Temperature

Difference between Thermal Energy and Temperature

Temperature

Learn about the three measures of temperature, kinetic energy, average kinetic energy, absolute zero and more in this video!

3 States of Matter For Kids

3 State of Matter for Kids- properties of matter with particles motion

Where does condensation come from?

Particle Illustration

Understanding Condensation

Understanding Condensation- Cartoon

Water Phase Changes

Water Phase Changes

Experimental Design: Variables, Groups, and Controls

Experimental Design: Variables, Groups, and Controls

Biggest Mistakes in Chemistry: Liquid to Gas

Biggest Mistakes in Chemistry: LIquid to Gas

janelle_spoltman
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Phase Changes with Particles of Water

Phase Changes with Particles of Water

Mythbusters: Elephant vs. Mouse

Mythbusters: Elephant vs. Mouse

Meniscus of liquids in graduated cylinders

Meniscus of liquids in graduated cylinders

Ted Ed: The real story behind Archimedes' Eureka

Ted Ed: The real story behind Archimedes' Eureka

Ted Ed: How taking a bath led to Archimedes' principle

Ted Ed: How taking a bath led to Archimedes' principle

Ted Ed: Why the Metric System Matters

Ted Ed: Why the Metric System Matters

How to use a meterstick

How to use a meterstick

Tools of Measurement: Graduated Cylinder and Triple Beam Balance

Tools of Measurement: Graduated Cylinder and Triple Beam Balance using Triple Beam Balance Gizmo

Ted Ed: How Atoms Bond

Ted Ed: How Atoms Bond

Ted Ed: The Genius of Mendeleev's Periodic Table

The elements had been listed and carefully arranged before Dmitri Mendeleev. They had even been organized by similar properties before. So why is Mendeelev’s periodic table the one that has endured? Lou Serico explains via Ekaaluminium, an element whose existence Mendeelev predicted decades before it was discovered